Stork (Ciconiidae) | Characteristics, Habitats & Amazing Facts

Name – Stork

Scientific Name : Ciconiidae

Type : Birds 

Age : 2 To 35 Years

Diet : carnivorous

Physical Characteristics:

Length : 100–125 cm

Weight : 2.3–4.5 kg

Colour : Adults have white with black primary feathers and Young birds are duller in colour and have black beaks and greyish yellow legs 

Skin Type : Feathers

Wingspan : 100 cm to 215 cm

Current Population : 700,000-704,000

Current Population Trend : Decreasing 

Native : Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia Florida and Argentina.

Facts

Main Prey : fish, frogs, crayfish, large insects, and occasionally small alligators and mice.

Habitat : flooded grasslands, light woodland, marshes and paddyfields, wet meadows, river backwaters and ponds. 

Predators : raccoons, caracaras and other birds of prey.

Favourite Food : fish and other aquatic invertebrates

Amazing Facts

  • The storks, like the wood storks, are a distinct species of medium to large-sized birds.
  • While certain freshwater fishing interests may consider herons as unwanted rivals, the members of this order are usually viewed as either advantageous or neutral to the economy.
  • While certain freshwater fishing interests may consider herons as unwanted rivals, the members of this order are usually viewed as either advantageous or neutral to the economy.
  • The white stork of Europe and northern Asia is a traditional long-distance migrant, having travelled as far as South Africa and India. The black stork (Ciconia nigra) makes a similar migration, but travellers to Africa are unable to travel past the Zambezi River in Mozambique.
  • South Africa, on the other hand, has a sparse native population that is thought to have been derived from refugees who historically made a longer trip during the twentieth century.
  • These birds move with a careful gait on land or in shallow water, but make swift strides when necessary. But for the flamingos, all perch on trees or, in a few instances, among reeds, with the majority of species roosting and nesting there.
  • Flamingos usually lay a single egg, while shoebills lay one or two. The average clutch size for ibis and spoonbills is three to four, three to six for storks and hammerheads, three to seven for herons, and four to six for bitterns.
  • The eggs are ovoid (that is, with the ends similarly rounded) and have a white chalky outer layer, under which there may be a coloured shell. In most species, the colours vary from white to light blue, orange, or buff, to olive brown in bitterns, and to dark greenish blue in some ibis.
  • In certain animals, the body is borne vertically, while in some, it is carried horizontally. The length of the neck and the length of the legs are generally connected.

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